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Topic: Worth.

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Elf of Beleriand - Rank 2
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Posts: 61
Date: Mar 22, 2006
Worth.

What is Tolkien's place among writers like Joyce, Dostoyevski and Hesse? And how high does that place trade?


 


When I read Hesse and switch fast to Tolkien, I am both impressed and dissapointed by his work.



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Anarion, Son of Elendil - rank 8
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Date: Mar 23, 2006
What is there to be dissapointed with?

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Utúlie'n  aurë!  Aiya  Eldalië  ar  Atanatári,  utúlie'n  aurë! 
Auta  i  lómë! 
Aurë entuluva!

Elf of Beleriand - Rank 2
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Posts: 61
Date: Mar 24, 2006

For instance, with the fact Tolkien's world is what it is and what it was meant to be.


The tale suffers from its glorious mythical fairy-story atmosphere, which does not allow the accounts on the psychology of the characters to develop fully. But this is more of a matter of genre, and not a disadvantage sooner than a necessity. I ever admire the beauty and the tone of Quenta Silmarillion and the amazing depth of -- Siddhartha, e. g. Question of tastes, may be. But Silmarillion might be rewritten in a different way, and still relate to the same history.



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Orc captain of Thangorodrim - Rank 3
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Date: Mar 25, 2006
Avantguardian -- You must realise that The Silmarillion, as it was published, was put together mainly by Christopher Tolkien, JRRT's son, posthumously. JRRT himself had no real say in the way in which that book was constructed, edited or published. Some things within the published Silmarillion are entirely written by Christopher Tolkien as well - the Ruin of Doriath chapter leaps out as one very prominent case of this.

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Rohan peasant - Rank 2
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Date: Apr 13, 2006

"The tale suffers from its glorious mythical fairy-story atmosphere, which does not allow the accounts on the psychology of the characters to develop fully."


Tolkien, I believe, was not meaning the story to be a "psychological", developmental, allagory. It was the wonderful, 'been passed down by word of mouth and written for the first time', type of tale that embodies the triumph of good over evil. It shows the struggle against evil, and, as in reallity, some of the times when it does conquer. But good does conquer in the end, giving it a wonderful feel of fulfilment and reallity. For good will triumph in the end, no matter what.


 



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Maiar
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Posts: 127
Date: Apr 17, 2006
Personally, I could ask for any more in Tolkien's writing. He is amazing, especially when it comes to his attention to detail! He created whole languages and truly developed something unique. As for me, the psychology of the characters just isn't important. The questions and gaps he leaves you with (though he manages to fill most of them) are an essential part of literature. So perhaps the gaps you see in character development are left there intentionally...Okay, I've totally confused myself!

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The more I consumath the more I hunger for, render me the Silmarils!
Elf of Beleriand - Rank 2
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Posts: 61
Date: Apr 17, 2006
The forum has swallowed my reply. I do not feel like reconstructing what I wrote then, and that was general, so I will ask you to excuse me.

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Samwise Gamgee - rank 9
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Date: May 10, 2006
Not quite sure what you mean by 'swallowed' up your reply Elvish Avantguardian?

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My Master Sauron the Great bids thee Welcome....
Elf of Beleriand - Rank 2
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Posts: 61
Date: May 18, 2006
Hmm, I meant "huh, like, I posted and -- wow! -- the post vanishes".

But you may hold me blameful. In both ways [linguistical and cyber one].

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Elf of Beleriand - Rank 2
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Posts: 32
Date: Mar 5, 2007
His place among writers? LOL - I'm sure that for Ronald it's still the "Bird and Baby". He, James, Fyodor and Hermann sit around together over beer and talk about anything but religion, psychology and philosophy, more than likely. As far as anyone can predict, each has a solid place in history, and even were their works comparable those places can't be traded like poker chips. Perhaps if you framed a more specific question you'd get a more satisfying answer than "Tolkien rocks, dude!"

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Lissenen ar' maska'lalaith tenna' lye omentuva
Dwarves - Rank 1
Status: Offline
Posts: 21
Date: Apr 4, 2007
Celebrindal wrote:

"Tolkien rocks, dude!"




What I was going to say. And it is also the only thing to say. And it is also so true it hurts. If you get me.......Tolkien Rocks ALOT!!



-- Edited by dwarf guy at 10:57, 2007-04-04

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