Tolkien Top 100 Middle Earth's Top 100
Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
 

Topic: The Hobbit

Post Info
Being lies with Eru - Rank 1
Status: Offline
Posts: 3
Date: Sep 6, 2011
The Hobbit

How does the tone affect the mood in the Hobbit? 



__________________
Tom Bombadil
Status: Offline
Posts: 1886
Date: Sep 7, 2011
demontiger627, What tone are you referring to?

__________________

Hey dol! merry dol! ring a dong dillo!
Ring a dong! hop along! fal lal the willow!
Tom Bom, Jolly Tom, Tom Bombadillo!

Being lies with Eru - Rank 1
Status: Offline
Posts: 3
Date: Sep 7, 2011
The author's tone. Basically, how does the author's tone affect his mood in THE HOBBIT?

__________________
Lord Elrond of Rivendell - Rank 9
Status: Offline
Posts: 2960
Date: Sep 8, 2011

demontiger627,

First ... welcome to the Tolkien Forums. I am only a member here but if I can help in any way please don't hesitate to ask.  I think you will enjoy the folks you meet here.  They come from all over the world and are bound by one trait ... we all love JRR Tolkien and his works.

 

Second ... I hate to admit I'm a little lost by what you mean as "tone"?

Are you speaking of a narrative style or perspective ...?

Do you mean how the author speaks to certain readers? (such as "fantasy" fans vs "fairy tale" vs "mythological" fans) Or to clarify do you mean Tolkien's different literary style in targeting his readers? (such as "The Hobbit" meant for children or "The Lord of The Rings" meant for adults)

Or are you speaking about the author using certain words to create a "dark, fearful or evil" feeling in the reader (as Chapter V ~ "Riddles in the Dark") or as versus a more "happy-go-lucky" feeling (as in Chapter  X ~ "A Warm Welcome")???


I am interested in understanding your point ... please amplify and clarify ...

Thank you,

And again "Welcome!"

Bear an Elf-Friend



__________________

Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit
Called or uncalled, God is present

Tom Bombadil
Status: Offline
Posts: 1886
Date: Sep 8, 2011
Our friend Bear, as always, put it right on the head. If you could chose one of those categories and talk about about it, even this

__________________

Hey dol! merry dol! ring a dong dillo!
Ring a dong! hop along! fal lal the willow!
Tom Bom, Jolly Tom, Tom Bombadillo!

Guard of Armenelos - Rank 4
Status: Offline
Posts: 753
Date: Sep 8, 2011

I personally found that Tolkien uses many tones throughout his works, for this purpose I will discuss them in LOTR:

When making introductions between the reader and the Hobbits, the mode was light and child-like. Every descriptive in the Long Expected Party (when it came to the Shire) was wistful, playful and wholesome. While every descriptive in the Emyn Muil was harsh, dark, and lifeless. Stone and the desolation of that place and places such as the Morgul Vale for example were described with malice and foreboding. The tones (if we can call these contrasts tone) were blended seamlessly by character traits. One of the characters in the book would assume some of the narrative weight by describing how those contrasts made them feel. Mainly the Hobbits did this because of their role of innocence in the books.
I think that the technique of 'tone' is a device used by all writers (again, if that is the true term for it).


If that is what you meant by 'tone' I think I can delve deeper into this topic when it comes to the Hobbit (as can every member here, I'm sure), but you must end the suspense!!!! It's killin' me.



__________________
Being lies with Eru - Rank 1
Status: Offline
Posts: 3
Date: Sep 9, 2011
MOOD: The mood of The Hobbit fluctuates between light and charming and dark and somber. The book starts with sunshine and good cheer at the outset of the adventure, shifts to dark, increasingly troublesome times with the encounters with the trolls, goblins, and spiders, becomes light again with the rescue from the elves, then passes through intense darkness and grief with the gold-lust of the dwarves and the Battle of Five Armies, before ending on a positive note. Within this general pattern are smaller swings in mood; dark passages often have some glint of hope and humor in them, and light passages are often tempered by a measure of foreboding. Indeed, The Hobbit alternates between light and dark continually, and the mood swings like a pendulum between these two extremes.

TONE: The narrators tone is light and casual, and he encourages his readers not to take his story too seriously by making frequent jokes at his characters expense. The narrators tone periodically becomes darker when the company faces great danger or defeat (as in the chapters taking place in Mirkwood), but for the most part, the story is brightly and warmly narrated.

My question is how does the TONE affect the MOOD?

__________________
Guard of Armenelos - Rank 4
Status: Offline
Posts: 753
Date: Sep 11, 2011
Demontiger627....Wow! I'm sorry I missed introductions...You actually cut through the muck on that one. Welcome and well met friend. Mood is the word, indeed. I'm going to sit back and enjoy what you said. I would echo the words you put down if I had the scruples. Once again, welcome.

__________________
Tom Bombadil
Status: Offline
Posts: 1886
Date: Sep 12, 2011
Demontiger, stories, from the dawn of time, were always meant to stir the senses. Just like a "Chick flick" will have parts that are driving some of us women to tears, while others make us thoughtful or happy or sad.

A good storyteller will pull on the heartstrings and make people feel as though they were actually there. In times of war and hopelessness, a good storyteller, will direct you toward times of good and hope in the lives of his audience. When soldiers sit around the campfire, they encourage each other with stories of valor and strength and heroism.

A good storyteller will always have a morale to his story to inspire those that listen. The different nuances in Tolkien's writing follows that in his books.

__________________

Hey dol! merry dol! ring a dong dillo!
Ring a dong! hop along! fal lal the willow!
Tom Bom, Jolly Tom, Tom Bombadillo!

Rohirrim of Edoras - Rank 4
Status: Offline
Posts: 395
Date: Sep 12, 2011
Using your discriptions of both mood and tone, obviously they directly effect each other. They go hand in hand to create a world that is emotionally stimulating, in both a light hearted and disturbing way, and easily relatable. Tolkien takes us by the hand, much like leading a child, and walks us through this fantastic world called Middle Earth. The combined effect of both mood and tone makes The Hobbit provoking and easy to read. Each part of the landscape and the nuances of characters adheres to our basic understanding of nature and human nature. The different tones in the story are expertly crafted to inspire the correct mood in the reader to not only allow us to accept, but immensley enjoy as well, the individual escapades, adventures and mishaps and the morality and grandure of the entire literary work. Tolkien was a master creator and an inspirational mega-mind. Between his extinsive education and his inate love for the natural world and an unwavering hero he gives his readers a sense of hope and inspires a little more faith in our fellow man.

__________________
The winds of heaven do not blow gentle.
Tom Bombadil
Status: Offline
Posts: 1886
Date: Sep 12, 2011
lomoduin, good to have you back mellon nín. A very well written post. You hit the nail right on the head.

__________________

Hey dol! merry dol! ring a dong dillo!
Ring a dong! hop along! fal lal the willow!
Tom Bom, Jolly Tom, Tom Bombadillo!

Rohirrim of Edoras - Rank 4
Status: Offline
Posts: 395
Date: Sep 12, 2011
Good to be back ArwenLegolas!! I've been preoccupide. I've missed the discussion. so Bring it on!! lol

__________________
The winds of heaven do not blow gentle.
Being lies with Eru - Rank 1
Status: Offline
Posts: 15
Date: Oct 10, 2011

Narrator: It was a dark and stormy night.

Character on the stage: Merry laughed til his sides ached.

Narrator: There came a crash from above, with the sound of splintering wood. The shudders banged loudly against the window casings.

Character on the stage: Gandalf chuckled, lit his pipe and gazed lazily into the warm fire.

Narrator: A low moaing and the rattling and scraping noises crossed the hall above.

Character on the stage: Merry poured Gandalf a cup of tea and presented him with a plate of warm biscuts.

Narrator: The sound of doors groaning open and banging closed increased, then a wailing followed by sudden quiet.

Character on the stage: "The biscuts were baked by my landlady, old Mrs. Waddle upstairs. She's very hard of hearing you know"

Narrator: The timbers of the little house shook violently.

Character on the stage: "Ah" Gandalf mused. "She's a very noisy neighbor"

Character on stage: Merry sighed and shook his head with a smile, "yes the dear soul has quite a temper when it rains."

The tone is ... matter of fact.
The mood is.. back and forth

Sometimes the matter of fact tone makes all the difference.



-- Edited by Imagineer on Monday 10th of October 2011 05:02:28 AM

__________________
Write in your heart that today is the best day in the year.
Samwise Gamgee - rank 9
Status: Offline
Posts: 2372
Date: Oct 16, 2011
Well put Imagineer!

__________________
My Master Sauron the Great bids thee Welcome....
 
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Chatbox

Please log in to join the chat!

Previous poll results (What is the 'Mightiest' weapon in Tolkiens myth?): Gurthang, blade of Turin - 28%, Narsil, sword of Elendil - 12%, Anduril, Sword of King Ellesar Aragorn - 23%, The Mace of the Witch King - 5%, Grond the dread hammer/hammer of the underworld -19%, Black axe of Gothmog - 4, Glamdring of Gandalf - 7%, Orcrist of Thorin - 1% A NEW POLL HAS BEEN ADDED TO TOLKIEN FORUMS Tolkien Forums - The Mythical world of J.R.R Tolkien