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Topic: Tolkien and time.

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Valar
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Posts: 120
Date: Mar 20, 2006
Tolkien and time.

Tolkien did study many different languages and mythology from many different lands and that comes clear when we look at all those races and languages from all his books. If we put his "main" work aside, which was writing and concentrate to those other things that he did simultanously with that writing. He was a teacher, he had his other responsibilities but still he had time to create a story that has proven to be something unique. And it almost feels like he writed that when he had time to do it. How much groundwork his books needed and how he had endurance and enthusiasm to keep doing so many things at the same time? Do we ever know the true amount of that work he did to create those stories?



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Anarion, Son of Elendil - rank 8
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Date: Mar 20, 2006
On that point do we have a definitive number to the amount of books Tolkien created?

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Orc captain of Thangorodrim - Rank 3
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Posts: 113
Date: Mar 25, 2006

From the inside cover of my edition of Unfinished Tales:


Works by J. R. R. Tolkien
The Hobbit
Leaf by Niggle
On Fairy Stories
Farmer Giles of Ham
The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth
The Lord of the Rings
The Adventures of Tom Bombadil
The Road Goes Ever On (with Donald Swann)
Smith of Wootton Major


Works Published Posthumously
Sir Gawain, Pearl and Sir Orfeo
The Father Christmas Letters
The Silmarillion
Pictures by JRR Tolkien
Unfinished Tales
The Letters of JRR Tolkien
Mr Bliss
Finn and Hengest
The Monsters and the Critics and Other Essays
Roverandom


The History of Middle-earth by Christopher Tolkien



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Samwise Gamgee - rank 9
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Date: Mar 25, 2006

I don't see Morgoths ring there? This is one great example, when you think you have finally listed all Tolkien books, you find one amiss and therefore there could be more.



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Valar
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Posts: 120
Date: Mar 25, 2006
mouthofsauron - The History of Middle-Earth

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Orc captain of Thangorodrim - Rank 3
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Posts: 113
Date: Mar 25, 2006
Yeah, Morgoth's Ring is Vol. X of the History of Middle-earth (HoMe) series. I'm glad some people know about it though, as it's a very good read and there are many interesting points brought up within it.

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Anarion, Son of Elendil - rank 8
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Date: Mar 28, 2006
I thought it was a serperate book?

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Utúlie'n  aurë!  Aiya  Eldalië  ar  Atanatári,  utúlie'n  aurë! 
Auta  i  lómë! 
Aurë entuluva!

Orc captain of Thangorodrim - Rank 3
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Posts: 87
Date: Mar 28, 2006

Morgoth's Ring is indeed published both as a seperate book, as well as in a larger volume (The History of Middle-Earth: Part Three) containing The War of the Jewels and The Peoples of Middle-Earth as well.  However, Morgoth's Ring is indeed no more a seperate novel than any other book from the History of Middle-Earth, since each is merely a collection of J.R.R. Tolkien's works that his son Christopher published well after Tolkien's death.  The entire collection is as follows:


I The Book of Lost Tales, Part One
II The Book of Last Tales, Part Two
III The Lays of Beleriand
IV The Shaping of Middle-Earth
V The Lost Road and Other Writings
VI The Return of the Shadow
VII The Treason of Isengard
VIII The War of the Ring
IX Sauron Defeated
X Morgoth's Ring
XI The War of the Jewels
XII The Peoples of Middle-Earth



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Samwise Gamgee - rank 9
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Date: Mar 28, 2006
So all of those subheading tales can be found in one large book?

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Orc captain of Thangorodrim - Rank 3
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Posts: 87
Date: Mar 28, 2006
Not in one large book.  All of HoME has been published both as twelve seperate volumes, as well as in three larger volumes.  Books I-V can be found in The Complete History of Middle-Earth: Part One, books VI-IX in Part Two, and books X-XII in Part Three, as well as in their own seperate volumes.

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Samwise Gamgee - rank 9
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Date: May 12, 2006
But insn't the History of middle-earth just covering all what has been covered in The silmarillion, Lotr, Unfinished Tales, The Hobbits etc?

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Orc captain of Thangorodrim - Rank 3
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Date: May 12, 2006
The History of Middle-earth delves into a number of topics. There is quite a bit of original material, but a lot of it deals with Tolkien's earliest notions of things and the evolution of the stories that were put into publication. For example, volumes IV through IX deal with the process of the writing of Lord of the Rings. It shows many of Tolkien's early drafts and maps, up until nearly the final product. There are also writings from after the publication of certain works as well, since Tolkien's ideas were always evolving and changing.

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Orc captain of Thangorodrim - Rank 3
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Date: May 13, 2006
Essentially, HoME can be broken up into three categories.  Volumes I-III deal with the earliest conceptions of Tolkien, providing the groundwork for the entire "secondary world".  Volumes IV-IX deal, as Narg said, with the evolutionary process of the writing of LotR.  Volumes X-XII are Tolkien's latest writings, including earlier works (such as the Quenta Silmarillion) revisited, as well as wholly new essays (including The Return of the Shadow, an abandoned sequal to LotR).

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Witchking of Angmar - Rank 10
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Posts: 3118
Date: May 13, 2006
I don't want to be a bother...but isn't the Return of the Shadow volume 6?
so that can't make it be in the category of volumes X to XII

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